Half-way-through-the-year resolutions at the ready…is that even a thing? Who cares. Any excuse to be, think or do better should be excuse enough, right?

And lurking somewhere in a foggy, seedy haze, amongst the pledges to renew the gym membership, cut down on the booze, and call your ma more often, you’ll find the most beneficial change of all; to quit smoking. Of course, quitting isn’t nearly as simple as throwing away your half finished pack of twenty, posting a ‘no smoking’ sticker on Instagram and getting on with your life. Nope, it requires willpower, self respect, education and much more. It’s a long game, this one, but here’s a good place to start; our 5 IDEAL ways to stop smoking for good.

CALL A SPADE AN ADDICTION

‘Just one, cause I’m stressed’. ‘I only have a drag when I’m out’. ‘Goes well with a drink, I can’t deny’…

We’ve all heard the plethora of reasons as to why a particular smoking habit doesn’t qualify as an addiction, but let’s be honest, if cigarettes have a hold on you, then you are addicted, make no mistake. The sooner you admit this, the sooner you can get the help you need. 

GET FRIENDS ON SIDE

Barbeques, garden and roof-top parties, days lounging on the common, craft can clasped; these are the moments we’re looking forward to the most as the t-shirt weather commences. But for those wishing to end their long dalliance with smoking, summer can be a time fraught with temptation. It’s all too easy to spark up in a beer garden when you’re hanging out with friends and the light headed, heavy handed grip of booze and peer pressure takes over. 

Nope, we’re not here to suggest you should let sociability suffer. Instead, get your mates on side. Tell people that you’re done with smoking and implore them to execute some tough love if you ask for a ‘drag on a ciggy’ after a few drinks. If your friends are incapable of this small but important request, get new ones.

SWAP IN LESS HARMFUL ALTERNATIVES

For some, the full throttle change from daily indulgence to abstinence-based recovery can be a shock too harsh to bear. The switch is just too drastic, and likelihood of regression or relapse is sometimes enhanced. Indeed, when cigarettes are concerned, it’s important to note that going “cold turkey” doesn’t always represent the most effective way to stop smoking. Each to their own, of course, but research has shown that only 3% of smokers find success this way.

For many, a day-by-day, gradual cutting down, then out, works better. In this period, less harmful alternatives, such a medically approved gum, patches or e-cigarettes can help. If you are interested in trying an e-cigarette, consider something like the Volcano Hybrid stationary vaporizer that will last you a life time if you just can’t give up the habit of smoking. Studies have suggested that the long-term effects of vaping are less than smoking cigarettes, as even though nicotine is still present, many of the auxiliary chemicals – such as carbon monoxide – are not. 

CHERISH THE POSITIVE CHANGE

Say it out loud so you know how it feels…’I don’t smoke’. Sounds kinda nice, doesn’t it? Embracing and cherishing a little positivity around quitting can be the push you need to keep it going. So, notice the physical changes; a better complexion, brighter teeth, breathing lighter and exercising easier…the list goes on. Go further and acknowledge the money saved; conservative estimates put the cost at £250 each month, or £3000 a year. That’s money you could divert to more wholesome, happy pursuits like a holiday (or two, or three). Result!

AVOID STRESS AND TRIGGERS

Many people smoke when faced with stressful situations, and certain triggers exist which can exacerbate attempts to give up. It’s important, then, to you steer clear of situations which might intensify your urge to smoke. Different people have different triggers, so find what works for you. If you normally have a cigarette after a meal, for example, replace this with a more beneficial habit, such as having like a cup of tea, taking a brisk walk or brushing your teeth.

 

SHARE
Rachel is the beauty and fashion director at IDEAL. She loves trying new products and is an avid fan of London's fashion, from the high end to the high street.