Maybe it’s all that time spent on the loo, with nothing to do but contemplate. Perhaps it’s the fact that the locked door of the bathroom represents our only true escape from this frantic, furious world. Whatever the reason, it comes as no surprise that so many of us are constantly trying to improve this space of sanctuary. Indeed, 54% of homeowners are either in the process of renovating their bathroom or plan to do so soon. 

As with any home overhaul project, the finer details can often get overlooked, the planning stage rushed, in the haste to have things finished and ready. Don’t be caught short. With the help of Daikin, a leading specialist in air conditioning solutions for the home including split AC units, here are 5 IDEAL things to consider before renovating your bathroom 

SPEAK WITH YOUR INSURER

Before you get started on planning any major change to a room in your home, you should first alert your home insurer to your intentions. You can’t account for every eventuality, and insurance claims are quite common during renovation projects; the prior warning will have you covered in the event of issues. The bathroom is a particularly prone place. Some of the most common claims surround water damage, burst pipes and flooding, all pretty costly should they befall your project. Don’t just fly by the seat of your pants; keep yourself covered.

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION

A rule for the bathroom, for sure. Because though we’d all like a brighter, fresher space full of love, light, aesthetic flourishes and fun, it’s functionality that trumps it all in the bathroom. First and foremost, it’s somewhere to wash and…well, you get the picture.

That doesn’t mean you can’t prioritise certain aspects and embrace the time you intend to spend there. If you’re a fan of a long and languid soak, a proper tub might be top of your list. If you sit on the fence in the bath/shower debate, than a combination of the two would be more suited to your needs.

Though you can’t actually try the toilet, bath or shower’s functionality out in the shop before you buy (imagine that), you can give them a test run for size, at least. Don’t be afraid to stand up in the showroom shower and recline in the shop’s bath, to get a feel for your key investments. Perhaps stop short of trying out the toilet, though.

VENTILATING MATTERS

Your bathroom will inevitably produce a lot of condensation, water vapour and of course, the odd unsavoury aroma. All need a place to escape. Without that ventilation, you’ll start seeing damage and mould cropping up over your newly renovated room pretty quickly. 

Consider the need for ventilation at the planning and design stage of your bathroom renovation and don’t just leave it to an open window to deal with. Though it may not feel like a priority, it can be the make or break between comfort and cursory visits.

TIMELESS TILES

Visually, there’s not so much you can do to a bathroom to make it aesthetically appealing. Sure, the odd nautical flourish, perhaps some art in blue, but really it’s a space which needs to be kept lean and clean. Tiles, then, are a vital vehicle when injecting a bit of personality into the space; a great way to change up a bathroom’s look without committing to a full renovation again too soon.

So, tap into current trends with your surfaces. Ideally, you want to pick timeless pieces for your bathroom to ensure they don’t go out of fashion a handful of years (or months!) after your project concludes. But that doesn’t mean you can’t accessories with the hottest trends for your bathroom; just be sure to reflect them in something that is easily replaceable. 

BE WARY OF BLUEPRINT

During the planning stage there will likely be projections, forecasts, drawings and blueprints. But agreeing to a blueprint based on a confused scanning of it is a recipe for disaster. Be wary. The fact is that not many of us are trained to read blueprints. So, to give yourself a better idea of what a blueprint is telling you, Architectural Digest recommends physically mapping out the design in your bathroom with painter’s tape. Use the tape to map out the outlines of where everything is going to go, then step back and take a look. This will give you a much better idea of the physical space taken up and what remains; a far more manageable overview for us layman.